273. The man who has planted a garden feels that he has done something for the good of the whole world. ~Vita Sackville-West

The most noteworthy thing about gardeners
is that they are optimistic, always enterprising, and never satisfied.
They always look forward to doing something better
than they have ever done before.
~Vita Sackville-West

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During World War I and World War II, victory gardens were planted at private residences and public parks in the United States, the United Kingdom, Canada, and Germany.  Vegetables, fruits, and herbs were grown to reduce the pressure on the public food supply brought on by the war efforts.  Not only did these gardens indirectly aid in the war efforts, but they were also considered civil “morale boosters.”  By planting them, gardeners felt empowered by their contribution of labor and rewarded by the produce they grew.  As a result victory gardens became a part of daily life on the home front.

Amos Bronson Alcott said, “Who loves a garden still his Eden keeps, perennial pleasures plants, and wholesome harvests reaps.”  Can you imagine what it must have been like to stand in Eden? And to listen for the Lord as He walked in the cool of the day?  There are times when I’m in my garden that I get a sense of the incredible thrill that must have been.  The perennial pleasures of my garden plant a rightness in my days and a comfortable feeling of harmony in my spirit.  And the wholesome harvests I reap are not just the fruits, the flowers, and the beauty all around me but also the peace it brings and the times when the deep sanctity of it touches my soul where the Lord is planting and digging for harvests of His own.

There is nothing better for mortals than to eat and drink, and find enjoyment in their toil.  This also, I saw, is from the hand of God; for apart from him who can eat or who can have enjoyment.  ~Ecclesiastes 2:24-25  ✝

7 thoughts on “273. The man who has planted a garden feels that he has done something for the good of the whole world. ~Vita Sackville-West

  1. Pingback: 273. The man who has planted a garden feels that he has done something for the good of the whole world. ~Vita Sackville-West | Sacred Touches

  2. Each year, as we prep the ground, plant and tend to our vegetable garden, I am most mindful of the gardens of the past which sustained so many families during “the War” —I imagine how today, we simply take for granted the planting of such gardens, never truly considering that our very existence could hinge upon the success or lack of–of our gardening adventure.
    If our garden fails or is not as bountiful as we would hope, I can always run to the store of farmer’s market to supplement what we lack—during my mother’s youth, those options during the bleak days of a World War were simply not available.
    Thank you for the poignant reminders

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    • I don’t do a vegetable garden because I don’t have a good place or soil, but my daughter and her husband do. Sometimes I think about doing a raised bed but that would require taking more of James’ grass and he says he’s NOT giving up any more. Hugs, Natalie 🙂

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