40. Spring shows what God can do with a drab and dirty world. ~Virgil Kraft

Awake, thou wintry earth –
fling off thy sadness!
Fair vernal flowers, laugh forth –
your ancient gladness!
~Thomas Blackburn

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Leaf by leaf, bud by bud, and blossom by blossom the spring of the year advances.   On warmish days, earth casts off its wintry gloom, and breezes broadcast sweetly-scented aromas.  The first butterflies then dare to soar and the hungry bees hum amid the glad laughter issuing forth from flowering bulbs and trees.  As a result the year’s initial poetry of rebirth is penned by the pollinating, aerial whirring of dainty wings.  In the meantime as I hurry about trying to taking photos of the blossoming narratives and their paramours, I often find myself asking the same question Walt Whitman once did.  “Why are there trees I never walk under but large and melodious thoughts descend upon me?”  The answer I’ve decided is that the arms of trees reach towards the heavens to gather sacred messages meant to draw mankind near to “the living Word of God in nature” as well as what is read in Scripture.

In our area the first verses of  “tree” poetry come from Saucer Magnolias.  Their big, goblet-shaped flowers pen exquisite couplets in pink and white.  Soon to follow are the brilliant white blossoms of Star Magnolias.  Though not quite enough lines to form a fourteen-lined sonnet, their twelve exquisite, “petal-poesy” lines form rhyming schemes as lovely as any Shakespearean sonnet.  Next and in perfect rhyming sequences come the double samaras.  Samaras, the scarlet, dual winged fruits of the Red Maple, look like long, slender fairy wings as they dance choric rhymes writ by the winds.  Then come the Eastern Redbuds and Bradford Pears that compose stunning free-verse stanzas in purple and white, each resplendent branch, a psalm written in praise of its Maker.  For a pollinator now there’s no quandary about where sweet nectaries are to be found for stanza after stanza they and I are lead in springtime to earth’s most festive and delicious banquets.

He has taken me to the banquet hall, and His banner over me is love.  ~Song of Songs 2:4

4 thoughts on “40. Spring shows what God can do with a drab and dirty world. ~Virgil Kraft

  1. Pingback: 40. Spring shows what God can do with a drab and dirty world. ~Virgil Kraft « Sacred Touches

  2. Beautiful, Natalie. Some of these older ones are just precious. I had fun reading through some of your older posts. I hope you don’t mind the couple of reblogs. Just wonderful, uplifting words.

    Liked by 1 person

    • Thank you so much, Lisa. I’m so glad you checked these older ones out. I was just getting started and didn’t have but one or two followers, so they were for naught it seems. I’m so glad you checked some of them out and enjoyed them. Love and hugs, N 🙂 3

      Liked by 1 person

      • Thanks, Natalie. I hear blogging is really lonely for a long time. I got to skip that part of it because Johnny had been blogging and I immediately got followers. So when I really enjoy a blog I just follow the related posts sometimes. ❤

        Liked by 1 person

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